NYC Educator: The Hybrid Model--Essential Work or Political Hackery?

NYC Educator: The Hybrid Model--Essential Work or Political Hackery?

The Hybrid Model--Essential Work or Political Hackery?



I’m vain. I think my subject, English as a new language, is the most important my students have. As such, I want them to understand structure. Teaching grammar, though, bores my kids to death. I have to find a better way.

One of the things that makes me crazy its the use of the present tense. When one of my students says, “She go to the store,” it makes me want to jump out a window. I’ll feign a heart attack or something to draw attention to my displeasure. I look for novel ways to practice this structure. One activity is a game that replicates an old TV show called What’s My Line. Students pretend to have one job or another, and we practice asking questions to figure out what it is.

Do you work in an office?
Do you need any special diplomas?
Do you work outside?


These are all good questions. I point out others that might guide their yes/ not questions toward an educated guess:

Who works in an office?
Who needs a diploma?


There’s one question I get that I object to, though.

Is your job important?


Grammar isn’t everything. I try to show students that all jobs are important. When I was their age, I worked as a dishwasher. I don’t know about you, but I find it pretty CONTINUE READING: 
NYC Educator: The Hybrid Model--Essential Work or Political Hackery?